One-Skillet Turkey with Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes Recipe

October brings a holiday many Canadians love: Thanksgiving! It is a time of year loved ones gather together to gobble up family favourite meals. It is only fitting that this month of the year is also Canadian Turkey Month. This means enjoying turkey on planned weeknight dinners, weekend family nights, or to wow special friends at a get-together. Canadian turkey can easily be the star of any meal. Canadian Turkey wants to share this tasty and amazing One-Skillet Turkey, Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes recipe to cook and serve throughout October!

Gobble Up Canadian Turkey Month with Canadian Turkey 

One-Skillet Turkey with Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes Recipe
Photo Credit: Canadian Turkey; Whole roasted turkey on a platter on a table.

Tasty Thanksgiving ideas

With Thanksgiving just weeks away, Canadians are getting ready to get together to celebrate this holiday. Memorable meals make this day extra special. Whether this will be your first holiday hosting or if the kitchen is your domain, let Canadian Turkey help you create a show-stopping Thanksgiving celebration.

Gobble Up Canadian Turkey Month with Canadian Turkey
Photo Credit: Canadian Turkey; Celebrate Canadian Turkey Month logo.

Are you a novice at roasting a whole turkey? Don’t fret! Canadian Turkey has your back by making it easy to do with their Turkey Basics Whole Turkey How-Tos. These step-by-step videos explain the basics to help you masterfully prepare a perfect Thanksgiving roast your loved ones will gobble up. These how-to tips and easy-to-follow directions will surprise you at how simple it is to create a special celebration meal.

Leftover love

Canadians love roasting a big bird. One great thing about making a large turkey is having a lot of leftover meat to make meals over the next few days. With a bit of planning, you can prep shredded, cubed, or sliced turkey and store it in the freezer. These extra bits can be used as helpful for a healthy meal.

Parents can benefit from having these leftovers on hand. They can be used in soups, salads, pastas, wraps, casseroles, sandwiches, and more! When you meal plan, there are endless ways to gobble up these power protein packs! These leftovers are perfect to use to substitute in your favourite recipes. Not sure what to do with leftover turkey? Hop over to Canadian Turkey’s website! They have a selection of delicious recipes for meal inspiration you can use in everyday meals!

Never meal planned before?

Meal planning for a week for your family may seem daunting, but once it is done, meals for a busy week become a breeze to prepare. Would you like some tips to help you get started? Here is a Use Your Turkey Leftovers and ten tips and to Quick-Start Weekday Meals printable Canadian Turkey shared to give you some inspiration!

10 WAYS TO MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR TURKEY LEFTOVERS 

One-Skillet Turkey with Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes Recipe
Photo Credit: Canadian Turkey; Use Your Canadian Turkey Leftovers To Quick-Start Weekday Meals printable.

1. To plan for leftovers, order a turkey that is several pounds bigger than what you need. That way you can be sure to cook once and eat twice, with leftover turkey to spare for additional meals once everyone has had their fill. 

2. Plan for leftovers by allocating 1½ – 2 pounds of turkey per person. This will give you ½ to 1 pound of extra turkey for each person at your table. 

3. Make sure you pack your leftovers within 2 hours after cooking to maintain the quality and safety of the food. 

4. Save and freeze the turkey carcass and bones, too. Use these to make a delicious turkey stock that can easily be frozen for use in soups, sauces, gravies and mashed potatoes. 

5. Freeze any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays. Once frozen, store in a zip top bag or air tight container and use as needed. 

One-Skillet Turkey with Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes Recipe
One-Skillet Turkey with Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes Recipe

More delicious turkey leftover ideas!

6. Leftover turkey freezes well, so make sure you fill your freezer! Wrap your turkey leftovers in plastic to avoid freezer burn and you’ll have ready portions on hand. Visit www.canadianturkey.ca for recipe inspiration and make salads, soups, pastas or casseroles in a snap! 

7. Store your leftovers properly for best results. Shred your turkey or cut it up into slices or cubes and freeze in convenient 1lb meal base portions that are ready to use right from the freezer. Store in an airtight container in the freezer for a quick start to weekday meals. 

8. Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes. 

9. Make a list of your favourite leftover turkey recipes. Add to that list so when the holiday season comes around every year you will have a head start with a selection of go-to recipes on hand. 

10. Stock up on air-tight, leak-proof containers or plastic bags for your leftovers or prepared meals so you’re ready to size up your meals any time.

A recipe to gobble up with your family

Would you like to have a new recipe to gobble up and share with your family this fall? This One-Skillet Turkey, Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes with Sun-dried Tomato Dressing recipe is a great one to put together and dish up!

One-Skillet Turkey with Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes and Sun-dried Tomato Dressing Recipe

One-Skillet Turkey with Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes Recipe
Photo Credit: Canadian Turkey; One-Skillet Turkey, Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes with Sun-dried Tomato Dressing recipe.
One-Skillet Turkey, Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes with Sun-dried Tomato Dressing
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
25 mins
Total Time
40 mins
 
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Canadian
Keyword: mushrooms,, one-skillet turkey, polenta cakes,, sun-dried tomato dressing
Servings: 6 people
Ingredients
  • 2 cups leftover cooked turkey meat
  • 1 500 gr tube pre-made polenta
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 cups assorted mushrooms
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes
  • 12 medium sized basil leaves
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Dressing:
  • 3 tbsp sundried tomato pesto
  • 2 tbsp greek yogurt
  • 1 tbsp water
Instructions
  1. Slice polenta into 3/4 inch rounds. Heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a skillet and sear polenta over medium heat until gently browned. Remove from the pan.
  2. Heat 1 tbsp olive oil over medium heat. Sauté mushrooms until lightly browned, 6-8 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Remove from pan.
  3. Add tomatoes to the skillet. Sear over high heat for 3-5 minutes.
  4. Lower heat. Add turkey and cook until gently warmed, add the mushrooms and mix until warm, 1-2 minutes.
For the dressing, mix together sundried tomato pesto, yogurt and water using a fork.
  1. To serve, plate each dish with 2-3 polenta cakes. Top with mushrooms, turkey and tomatoes.
  2. Drizzle with sundried tomato dressing and sprinkle with fresh basil.
  3. Serve immediately.
Recipe Notes

TIP: This dish makes a fabulous lunch the next day. You can also replace the polenta with rice or pasta.

More turkey inspiration

Are you still hungry for more additional tips, recipes, Turkey Basics videos, and HOT TOs? Visit canadianturkey.ca to find more cooking ideas to gobble up! Canadian Turkey makes your Thanksgiving easy with fabulous recipe ideas and turkey prep tips! The year-round whole turkey HOW-TOs section will give you a hand to create a whole Canadian turkey for your loved ones any time of the year. The Recipes section is brimming with yummy recipes for whole turkey, turkey cuts, and leftovers to help you serve delicious, nutritious, and versatile turkey every day!

Disclaimer: This post is generously sponsored by Canadian Turkey.

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Comments

  1. If stuffing the turkey, do so while the oven is preheating. Spoon stuffing lightly into turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking. (Allow ½ cup (125 ml) of stuffing per pound (500 g) of turkey.)

  2. My favourite tip is the spatchcocking. I’ve heard of it for chicken, but never considered doing it for a turkey. Would sure be a time-saver.

  3. Tip # 8. Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  4. When buying a turkey calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person or if you want leftovers, count on 1.5 lbs (700 g) per person. We love turkey leftovers so 1.5 lbs per person will be my guide.

  5. The brining process, soaking a whole turkey in water saturated with salt, is believed by many to be a favourable way to prepare turkey.

  6. Cross-contamination is how harmful bacteria spread. Keep raw meat, poultry, and seafood and their juices away from foods that won’t be cooked.

  7. My favourite tip is about storing the leftovers properly – chopping/slicing the pieces into useable sizes before freezing so that they’re ready for immediate use when needed for the leftover meal idea.

  8. I like the tip to make a list of favourite leftover turkey recipes. Add to that list so when the holiday season comes around we are ready to use the recipes!

  9. I learned how to carve a turkey properly because before it looked like a hack job. Also learned how to freeze it properly for use in leftovers.

  10. I learned that bacteria multiply fastest at temperatures between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F). Chilling food properly is one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of food borne illness.

  11. I had never thought of barbecuing a whole turkey before, but I might do now the tip section had a handy cooktime guideline based on weight which is really helpful

  12. I like the tip #9. to Make a list of your favourite leftover turkey recipes – it would be perfect to have that go-to list of recipes on hand

  13. I learnt that washing/rinsing meat and poultry prior to cooking is not necessary and may promote cross-contamination to other foods

  14. the addition of the salt in the brining procedure will yield a salty flavour to the turkey so it is wise to omit salt as an ingredient in the turkey stock. thanks

  15. BBQing a whole turkey is easy, just put it breast side up and pour stock in the pan. Baste as you would if done in the oven.

  16. I learned how to Carve the Drumsticks on a turkey. I never carve them I just leave them whole and whoever wants them eats them that way..

  17. I learned that you should store your leftovers properly for best results. Shred your turkey or cut it up into slices or cubes and freeze in convenient 1lb meal base portions that are ready to use right from the freezer. Store in an airtight container in the freezer for a quick start to weekday meals.

  18. CARVING THE DRUMSTICK AND THIGH
    Remove the drumstick and thigh by pressing the leg away from the body of the bird. The joint connecting the leg to the backbone will often snap free, or may be severed easily with a knife point. Cut the dark meat completely from the body by following the body contour carefully with the knife.

  19. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  20. Freeze any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays. Once frozen, store in a zip top bag or air tight container and use as needed. Great idea!

  21. Learned about the cold water method of thawing- It’s fast but you have to hange the water at least every hour.
    Also allow 1 hour of thawing time per pound (2 hours/kg).

  22. SLICING DARK MEAT
    Place the drumstick and thigh on a separate plate and cut through the connecting joint. Both pieces may be individually sliced. Tilt the drumstick to a convenient angle, slicing towards the plate.

  23. My favourite tip is: 4. Save and freeze the turkey carcass and bones, too. Use these to make a delicious turkey stock that can easily be frozen for use in soups, sauces, gravies and mashed potatoes.

    I actually use the turkey carcass the next day to make broth for homemade turkey soup! So good!

  24. A good tip to remember is to keep your turkey and it’s juices away from foods that won’t be cooked to prevent cross contamination.

  25. Freezing those leftovers & sorting the dark and light meat is my favorite tip! How handy to have portions ready to go for your recipes in the week. And those turkey nachos would be one of my main go-to’s!

  26. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  27. I learned that when buying a whole turkey it is best to Calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person in order to determine the size you will need based on the number of guests.

  28. PREPARING THE BREAST
    Place the knife parallel and as close to the wing as possible. Make a deep cut into the breast, cutting right to the bone. This is your base cut. All breast slices stop at this horizontal cut.

  29. This method of thawing a turkey is the safest, as it keeps the meat cold until it is completely defrosted.

    Place turkey on a tray on a bottom shelf in refrigerator.
    Allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).
    Health Canada recommends that your refrigerator is set at 4 °C (40 °F)

  30. If you are deep frying a turkey make sure that the turkey is totally thawed before immersing it in the oil. If you don’t it could overflow the oil in the fryer and it would be dangerous.

  31. I learned that whole turkeys can be frozen up to a year. That’s good because when turkeys are on sale we like to buy one or two.

  32. CARVING THE BREAST
    Carve downward, ending at the base cut. Start each new slice slightly higher up on the breast. Keep slices thin and even.

  33. I learnt that you should spoon stuffing lightly into the turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking.

  34. I learned that there are absolutely no quality differences between fresh and frozen turkeys. So choose the product that works best for you.

  35. I learned what spatchcocking means — refers to the removal of the backbone of a bird so that it can be flattened prior to grilling or roasting

  36. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear

  37. Washing/rinsing meat and poultry prior to cooking is not necessary and may promote cross-contamination to other foods. If you choose to rinse raw poultry, be sure to wash sink and tap areas well with hot soapy water and disinfect with a bleach solution

  38. REFRIGERATOR METHOD:
    This method of thawing a turkey is the safest, as it keeps the meat cold until it is completely defrosted.

    Place turkey on a tray on a bottom shelf in refrigerator.
    Allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).
    Health Canada recommends that your refrigerator is set at 4 °C (40 °F).

  39. My favourite tip Canadian Turkey shared to make tasty turkey leftover meals my family would love to gobble up is having leftovers on hand to be used in soups, salads, pastas, wraps, casseroles, sandwiches, and more!

  40. when looking to buy a turkey, buy one that is big enough for what you need, Calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person. Or if you want leftovers, count on 1.5 lbs (700 g) per person

  41. If stuffing the turkey, do so while the oven is preheating. Spoon stuffing lightly into turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking. (Allow ½ cup (125 ml) of stuffing per pound (500 g) of turkey.

  42. I learnt the recipe for brining a turkey: one 15 to 18 pound (6.8 – 8.2 kg) whole turkey, thawed, giblets and neck removed; (Do not use a pre-stuffed or ready-to-roast turkey)
    • 2 cups (500 mL) Kosher or sea salt (1 cup (250 mL) per 1 gallon (3.785 L) of water)
    • 2 cups (500 mL) brown sugar
    • Spices and herbs as desired – perhaps experiment with a variety of items such as cinnamon sticks, lemon zest, ginger, garlic, shallots, rosemary, thyme, sage
    • 2 gallons (7.8 L) water
    My son always brines our turkeys, not too sure if the recipe’s the same though.

  43. Bacteria multiply fastest at temperatures between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F) so you need to be very diligent about handling your turkey.

  44. Roast uncovered, or loosely covered with foil. If you choose to baste your turkey, limit the number of times you open and close your oven (once per hour is sufficient).

  45. COLD WATER METHOD:
    Keep the turkey in its original wrapping.
    In a large container, cover the turkey completely with cold water.
    Change the water at least every hour.
    Allow 1 hour of thawing time per pound (2 hours/kg).

  46. Washing/rinsing meat and poultry prior to cooking is not necessary and may promote cross-contamination to other foods. If you choose to rinse raw poultry, be sure to wash sink and tap areas well with hot soapy water and disinfect with a bleach solution.

  47. I learned that if you want to brine a turkey it requires a 6-24 hour soaking period and it should be done the day before roasting.

  48. I like the “Make a list of favourite leftover recipes” tip – i find often I don’t know what to do with leftovers and this would definitely help out!

  49. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone

  50. DEEP FRYING A WHOLE TURKEY

    If you are using a frozen turkey, be sure that the turkey is totally thawed before immersing it in the oil. If the turkey is still frozen, the oil can spill over the top and be dangerous.

  51. urkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  52. I learned that you should divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  53. Cooked turkey can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.

  54. I learned that when deep frying a whole turkey the oil must be at a minimum of 375 degrees F and it would take approx. 35 minutes to cook

  55. Food handling safety risks at home are more common than most people think. The four easy lessons of Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill can help prevent harmful bacteria from making your family sick.

  56. favourite tip is if you are thawing the turkey in the refrigerator allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).

  57. I learnt how to remove the drumstick and thigh, by pressing the leg away from the body of the bird. The joint connecting the leg to the backbone will often snap free, or may be severed easily with a knife point. Cut the dark meat completely from the body by following the body contour carefully with the knife.

  58. i learned All turkeys processed in a federally inspected plant bear a “Canada Approved” or “Canada” health inspection stamp.

  59. I learned that you can save and cook the carcass to make broth for a turkey soup- honestly, such a great idea and you truly use all of the turkey then, with nothing wasted!

  60. BARBEQUE A WHOLE TURKEY
    You can easily use your barbeque to prepare a grilled turkey that’s moist, tender, delicious and nutritious. Prepare turkey as you would if you were roasting it in your oven:

  61. Roast uncovered, or loosely covered with foil. If you choose to baste your turkey, limit the number of times you open and close your oven (once per hour is sufficient)

  62. I discovered that Canada Grade A turkeys are well shaped and meaty with even fat covering.
    Canada Utility turkeys are birds with minor skin tears or one or more parts missing which in no way affects the quality.

  63. A great tip for turkey is bacteria multiply fastest at temperatures between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F), so chilling food properly is one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of food borne illness.

  64. I learned cooking the turkey to an internal temperature of 170°F (77°C) in the thigh for an unstuffed turkey and 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey

  65. BARBEQUE A WHOLE TURKEY – Place pan on barbeque grill preheated to medium and close lid. After 20 – 30 minutes, lower heat to medium-low and tent turkey with foil to prevent over-browning.

  66. Carving the breast: Place the knife parallel and as close to the wing as possible. Make a deep cut into the breast, cutting right to the bone. This is your base cut. All breast slices stop at this horizontal cut.

  67. BARBEQUE A WHOLE TURKEY – Baste every 15 – 20 minutes. For barbeques with temperature settings, keep barbeque adjusted to 350°F – 375°F (177° C – 190°C). Add more water/stock to pan if it dries out during cooking.

  68. I learnt about CARVING THE DRUMSTICK AND THIGH
    Remove the drumstick and thigh by pressing the leg away from the body of the bird. The joint connecting the leg to the backbone will often snap free, or may be severed easily with a knife point. Cut the dark meat completely from the body by following the body contour carefully with the knife.

  69. Cooked turkey can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator. This takes the guesswork out of that age old question of – Is this still good?

  70. This method of thawing a turkey is the safest, as it keeps the meat cold until it is completely defrosted
    Place turkey on a tray on a bottom shelf in refrigerator.
    Allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).
    Health Canada recommends that your refrigerator is set at 4 °C (40 °F).

  71. All turkeys processed in a federally inspected plant bear a “Canada Approved” or “Canada” health inspection stamp. This stamp tells you that the product is safe to eat.

  72. CARVING THE DRUMSTICK AND THIGH
    Remove the drumstick and thigh by pressing the leg away from the body of the bird. The joint connecting the leg to the backbone will often snap free, or may be severed easily with a knife point. Cut the dark meat completely from the body by following the body contour carefully with the knife.

  73. Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  74. My favourite tip is #4. Save and freeze the turkey carcass and bones, too. Use these to make a delicious turkey stock that can easily be frozen for use in soups, sauces, gravies and mashed potatoes. I always do this. It makes the BEST soup.

  75. The best way to make sure your turkey is cooked perfectly is to use a thermometer to get it to the right temperature. You need to insert the meat thermometer in the deepest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  76. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  77. Learned that Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey.

  78. Bacteria can spread throughout the kitchen and get on hands, cutting boards, knives and counter tops. Frequent cleaning can keep that from happening. Always wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food

  79. OLD WATER METHOD:
    Keep the turkey in its original wrapping.
    In a large container, cover the turkey completely with cold water.
    Change the water at least every hour.
    Allow 1 hour of thawing time per pound (2 hours/kg).

  80. Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  81. Grade A vs. Utility?

    Turkeys are graded according to quality of appearance. Canada Grade A turkeys are well shaped and meaty with even fat covering.

  82. Even for experienced cooks, the improper heating and preparation of food means bacteria can survive. Use a food thermometer – you can’t tell if food is cooked safely by how it looks.

  83. BARBEQUE A WHOLE TURKEY – Lightly brush with oil or melted margarine and sprinkle outside and cavity with seasonings.

  84. Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  85. Roasting a Whole Turkey – If stuffing the turkey, do so while the oven is preheating. Spoon stuffing lightly into turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking. (Allow ½ cup (125 ml) of stuffing per pound (500 g) of turkey.)

  86. Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  87. Insert the meat thermometer in the deepest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey.

  88. If stuffing the turkey, do so while the oven is preheating. Spoon stuffing lightly into turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking. (Allow ½ cup (125 ml) of stuffing per pound (500 g) of turkey.)

  89. ROASTING A WHOLE TURKEY – Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  90. Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  91. BARBEQUE A WHOLE TURKEY. Place pan on barbeque grill preheated to medium and close lid. After 20 – 30 minutes, lower heat to medium-low and tent turkey with foil to prevent over-browning. Baste every 15 – 20 minutes.

  92. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  93. If the turkey is not fully submerged, mix additional brining solution in the ratios indicated above until there’s enough liquid to cover the entire turkey

  94. ROASTING A WHOLE TURKEY – When roasting, any stuffing placed in the cavity of the bird should read and internal temperature of at least 165°F (74°C).
    Remove the turkey from the oven when cooking is completed and let stand 20 minutes to allow the juices to set.

  95. Frozen turkeys can be purchased in advance, allowing consumers to take advantage of special sales and coupons. Main point of fresh turkeys are you don’t have to take the time to thaw.

  96. I like the tip on storing cooked turkey. I can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.

  97. Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  98. Bacteria multiply fastest at temperatures between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F), so chilling food properly is one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of foodborne illness.

  99. An old British term, spatchcocked, refers to the removal of the backbone of a bird so that it can be flattened prior to grilling or roasting

  100. SAFE FOOD HANDLING – CLEAN
    Bacteria can spread throughout the kitchen and get on hands, cutting boards, knives and counter tops. Frequent cleaning can keep that from happening. Always wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food.

  101. Cooked turkey can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.

  102. SAFE FOOD HANDLING – SEPARATE
    Cross-contamination is how harmful bacteria spread. Keep raw meat, poultry, and seafood and their juices away from foods that won’t be cooked.

  103. Brining adds flavour and moisture to your turkey meat. The brining process requires a 6-24 hour soaking period, and ideally should be done the day before roasting.

  104. After cooking, keep turkey hot (above 140°F (60°C)) or refrigerate (below 40°F (4°C)). DO NOT LEAVE TURKEY AT ROOM TEMPERATURE FOR MORE THAN 2 HOURS!!! I didn’t know that, not sure we manage that with a huge meal, guests and then cleaning the carcass for turkey soup!

  105. I learned about spatchcocking and that it refers to the removal of the backbone of a bird so that it can be flattened prior to grilling or roasting.

  106. BUYING A WHOLE TURKEY – GRADE A VS. UTILITY? – “There is no quality or taste difference between a Canada Grade A turkey or Utility grade turkey”.

  107. CARVING THE BREAST
    Carve downward, ending at the base cut. Start each new slice slightly higher up on the breast. Keep slices thin and even.

  108. Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  109. When deep frying a whole turkey for best results, choose a turkey weighing less than 15 pounds (less than 6.8 kg).

  110. All turkeys processed in a federally inspected plant bear a “Canada Approved” or “Canada” health inspection stamp. This stamp tells you that the product is safe to eat.

  111. SAFE FOOD HANDLING – COOK
    Even for experienced cooks, the improper heating and preparation of food means bacteria can survive. Use a food thermometer – you can’t tell if food is cooked safely by how it looks.

  112. When roasting, any stuffing placed in the cavity of the bird should read and internal temperature of at least 165°F (74°C).

  113. Bacteria multiply fastest at temperatures between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F), so chilling food properly is one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of foodborne illness

  114. Thoroughly rinse under a slow stream of cool water, rubbing gently to release salt, both inside and out. It is important to ensure that the turkey is rinsed extensively.

  115. Learned more about bbqing unstuffed turkey. . For barbeques with temperature settings, keep barbeque adjusted to 350°F – 375°F (177° C – 190°C.. takes up for 4 hours to extra huge ones.

  116. BUYING A WHOLE TURKEY – TIP: Calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person. Or if you want leftovers, count on 1.5 lbs (700 g) per person.

  117. Canada Utility turkeys are birds with minor skin tears or one or more parts missing which in no way affects the quality. Use these turkeys for cutting up or when carving before serving.

  118. Cooked turkey can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.

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This school year is going to be a unique one and DK Canada wants to support all the parents out there with...

How To Make A Hippie Costume For Halloween

If you decide to be a hippie for Halloween, making a hippie costume is fun, inexpensive, and allows you to express your...