Gobble Up Canadian Turkey Month with Canadian Turkey #CdnTurkeyMonth #Giveaway ~ CAN 10/18

| September 20, 2019 | 325 Comments

October brings a holiday many Canadians love: Thanksgiving! It is a time of year loved ones gather together to gobble up family favourite meals. It is only fitting that this month of the year is also Canadian Turkey Month. This means enjoying turkey on planned weeknight dinners, weekend family nights, or to wow special friends at a get-together. Canadian turkey can easily be the star of any meal. Canadian Turkey wants to share tasty ideas and amazing recipes to cook and serve throughout October!

Gobble Up Canadian Turkey Month with Canadian Turkey 

Gobble Up Canadian Turkey Month with Canadian Turkey
Photo Credit: Canadian Turkey; Whole roasted turkey on a platter on a table.

Tasty Thanksgiving ideas

With Thanksgiving just weeks away, Canadians are getting ready to get together to celebrate this holiday. Memorable meals make this day extra special. Whether this will be your first holiday hosting or if the kitchen is your domain, let Canadian Turkey help you create a show-stopping Thanksgiving celebration.

Gobble Up Canadian Turkey Month with Canadian Turkey
Photo Credit: Canadian Turkey; Celebrate Canadian Turkey Month logo.

Are you a novice at roasting a whole turkey? Don’t fret! Canadian Turkey has your back by making it easy to do with their Turkey Basics Whole Turkey How-Tos. These step-by-step videos explain the basics to help you masterfully prepare a perfect Thanksgiving roast your loved ones will gobble up. These how-to tips and easy-to-follow directions will surprise you at how simple it is to create a special celebration meal.

Leftover love

Canadians love roasting a big bird. One great thing about making a large turkey is having a lot of leftover meat to make meals over the next few days. With a bit of planning, you can prep shredded, cubed, or sliced turkey and store it in the freezer. These extra bits can be used as helpful for a healthy meal.

Parents can benefit from having these leftovers on hand. They can be used in soups, salads, pastas, wraps, casseroles, sandwiches, and more! When you meal plan, there are endless ways to gobble up these power protein packs! These leftovers are perfect to use to substitute in your favourite recipes. Not sure what to do with leftover turkey? Hop over to Canadian Turkey’s website! They have a selection of delicious recipes for meal inspiration you can use in everyday meals!

Never meal planned before?

Meal planning for a week for your family may seem daunting, but once it is done, meals for a busy week become a breeze to prepare. Would you like some tips to help you get started? Here is a Use Your Turkey Leftovers and ten tips and to Quick-Start Weekday Meals printable Canadian Turkey shared to give you some inspiration!

10 WAYS TO MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR TURKEY LEFTOVERS 

Gobble Up Canadian Turkey Month with Canadian Turkey
Photo Credit: Canadian Turkey; Use Your Canadian Turkey Leftovers To Quick-Start Weekday Meals printable.

1. To plan for leftovers, order a turkey that is several pounds bigger than what you need. That way you can be sure to cook once and eat twice, with leftover turkey to spare for additional meals once everyone has had their fill. 

2. Plan for leftovers by allocating 1½ – 2 pounds of turkey per person. This will give you ½ to 1 pound of extra turkey for each person at your table. 

3. Make sure you pack your leftovers within 2 hours after cooking to maintain the quality and safety of the food. 

4. Save and freeze the turkey carcass and bones, too. Use these to make a delicious turkey stock that can easily be frozen for use in soups, sauces, gravies and mashed potatoes. 

5. Freeze any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays. Once frozen, store in a zip top bag or air tight container and use as needed. 

More delicious turkey leftover ideas!

6. Leftover turkey freezes well, so make sure you fill your freezer! Wrap your turkey leftovers in plastic to avoid freezer burn and you’ll have ready portions on hand. Visit www.canadianturkey.ca for recipe inspiration and make salads, soups, pastas or casseroles in a snap! 

7. Store your leftovers properly for best results. Shred your turkey or cut it up into slices or cubes and freeze in convenient 1lb meal base portions that are ready to use right from the freezer. Store in an airtight container in the freezer for a quick start to weekday meals. 

8. Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes. 

9. Make a list of your favourite leftover turkey recipes. Add to that list so when the holiday season comes around every year you will have a head start with a selection of go-to recipes on hand. 

10. Stock up on air-tight, leak-proof containers or plastic bags for your leftovers or prepared meals so you’re ready to size up your meals any time.

A recipe to gobble up with your family

Would you like to have a new recipe to gobble up and share with your family this fall? This One-Skillet Turkey, Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes with Sun-dried Tomato Dressing recipe is a great one to put together and dish up!

Gobble Up Canadian Turkey Month with Canadian Turkey
Photo Credit: Canadian Turkey; One-Skillet Turkey, Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes with Sun-dried Tomato Dressing recipe.
One-Skillet Turkey, Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes with Sun-dried Tomato Dressing
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
25 mins
Total Time
40 mins
 
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Canadian
Keyword: mushrooms,, one-skillet turkey, polenta cakes,, sun-dried tomato dressing
Servings: 6 people
Ingredients
  • 2 cups leftover cooked turkey meat
  • 1 500 gr tube pre-made polenta
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 cups assorted mushrooms
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes
  • 12 medium sized basil leaves
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Dressing:
  • 3 tbsp sundried tomato pesto
  • 2 tbsp greek yogurt
  • 1 tbsp water
Instructions
  1. Slice polenta into 3/4 inch rounds. Heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a skillet and sear polenta over medium heat until gently browned. Remove from the pan.
  2. Heat 1 tbsp olive oil over medium heat. Sauté mushrooms until lightly browned, 6-8 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Remove from pan.
  3. Add tomatoes to the skillet. Sear over high heat for 3-5 minutes.
  4. Lower heat. Add turkey and cook until gently warmed, add the mushrooms and mix until warm, 1-2 minutes.
For the dressing, mix together sundried tomato pesto, yogurt and water using a fork.
  1. To serve, plate each dish with 2-3 polenta cakes. Top with mushrooms, turkey and tomatoes.
  2. Drizzle with sundried tomato dressing and sprinkle with fresh basil.
  3. Serve immediately.
Recipe Notes

TIP: This dish makes a fabulous lunch the next day. You can also replace the polenta with rice or pasta.

More turkey inspiration

Are you still hungry for more additional tips, recipes, Turkey Basics videos, and HOT TOs? Visit canadianturkey.ca to find more cooking ideas to gobble up! Canadian Turkey makes your Thanksgiving easy with fabulous recipe ideas and turkey prep tips! The year-round whole turkey HOW-TOs section will give you a hand to create a whole Canadian turkey for your loved ones any time of the year. The Recipes section is brimming with yummy recipes for whole turkey, turkey cuts, and leftovers to help you serve delicious, nutritious, and versatile turkey every day!

Gobble Up Canadian Turkey Month with Canadian Turkey
Gobble Up Canadian Turkey Month with Canadian Turkey

Disclaimer: This post is generously sponsored by Canadian Turkey.

A Canadian Turkey Canadian Turkey Month Giveaway!

Gobble Up Canadian Turkey Month with Canadian Turkey
Photo Credit: Canadian Turkey; One-Skillet Turkey, Mushrooms and Polenta Cakes with Sun-dried Tomato Dressing recipe.

Are you ready to celebrate Canadian Turkey Month with your family? Canadian Turkey would like to give one lucky Ottawa Mommy Club follower a $75 Hudson’s Bay e-gift card (redeemable at The Bay or thebay.com) to help celebrate Thanksgiving!

The ARV of this prize package is $75!

This giveaway is open to Canadian residents and ends at 11:59 PM EDT on October 18th, 2019. 

Good luck!

If there are any issues with this giveaway, please email us at ottawamommyclub@hotmail.com.

To enter more awesome OMC giveaways, click HERE!

Rules: Open to Canadian residents 18 +. You have 48 hours to reply by email once you are notified as the winner. If you don’t, we will draw another entry. Prize is non-transferable. No substitution or cash equivalent of prizes is permitted. The selected winner must correctly answer a mathematical question in order to win the prize mentioned above. Please note that prize fulfillment takes up to 30 days. The Ottawa Mommy Club is not responsible for prize fulfillment and for the delivery/shipment of the prize(s) mentioned above. For our complete set of rules, please click here.

Click here to view this promotion.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Category: Blogs, Contests, Contests/Giveaways, Dining, Food, Holidays, Main Dish, Recipes, Thanksgiving, Thanksgiving, Themes, Tips, Weekly Themes

About the Author ()

Comments (325)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Huguette E. says:

    I like tip #7 … nice to have turkey in the freezer ready to be used!

  2. Shirley P says:

    If stuffing the turkey, do so while the oven is preheating. Spoon stuffing lightly into turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking. (Allow ½ cup (125 ml) of stuffing per pound (500 g) of turkey.)

  3. Mary Boudreau says:

    My fave tip is to freeze left over gravy and turkey

  4. ducky says:

    Save the carcass and bones for soup stock.

  5. Amy C says:

    I like the tip about Freezing any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays.

  6. 409cope says:

    I like the tip that to allow for leftovers you should allow 1½ – 2 pounds of turkey per person.

  7. Diane T says:

    DEEP FRYING A WHOLE TURKEY was very useful!

  8. Lester C says:

    I learned how to thaw a whole turkey

  9. Elaine G says:

    I like the tip to freeze any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays.Never thought of that.

  10. l p says:

    Never thaw your turkey at room temperature! thanks

  11. l p says:

    will try spatchcocking this year. thanks

  12. Silvia D says:

    “Spatchcocking” or Flattening a Whole Turkey is something I really want to try!

  13. Trevor L says:

    I liked the tip to freeze any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays, never thought of that before.

  14. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    I learnt about the expert carving tips – always good to know.

  15. JoKing says:

    Love to save the carcass for soup stock.

  16. Carole D says:

    I learn how to Spatchcocking or Flattening a Whole Turkey! This methode is perfect if your turkey too big for your pot!

  17. piroska says:

    My favourite tip is the spatchcocking. I’ve heard of it for chicken, but never considered doing it for a turkey. Would sure be a time-saver.

  18. krisha4444 says:

    I learned that you never thaw your turkey at room temp

  19. micheline says:

    Tip # 8. Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  20. Heather Swanson says:

    I give some of the lesser pieces to pets

  21. Dianne G. says:

    My favourite tip is if you are thawing the turkey in the refrigerator allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).

  22. Dianne G. says:

    When buying a turkey calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person or if you want leftovers, count on 1.5 lbs (700 g) per person. We love turkey leftovers so 1.5 lbs per person will be my guide.

  23. DebP says:

    Spatchcocking is something I’ve heard about occasionally, and I’m now encouraged to give it a try. Thank you for the info.

  24. Kristi says:

    I like the tip about saving and freezing the turkey carcass and bones. It’s a great way to make more meals out of it!

  25. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    The brining process, soaking a whole turkey in water saturated with salt, is believed by many to be a favourable way to prepare turkey.

  26. Juliee Fitze says:

    I like the tip about Freezing any leftover gravy in muffin tins .

  27. Shirley says:

    Cross-contamination is how harmful bacteria spread. Keep raw meat, poultry, and seafood and their juices away from foods that won’t be cooked.

  28. Erin says:

    My favourite tip is Deep Frying a Whole Turkey!

  29. Jennifer P. says:

    My favourite tip is about storing the leftovers properly – chopping/slicing the pieces into useable sizes before freezing so that they’re ready for immediate use when needed for the leftover meal idea.

  30. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    I learnt that Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill can help prevent harmful bacteria from making your family sick.

  31. l p says:

    The four easy lessons of Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill can help prevent harmful bacteria from making your family sick. thanks

  32. Calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person was a great tip as I never know how big of a turkey I need.

  33. Shirley O says:

    I learned that when roasting a turkey it is best to let it stand 20 minutes after cooking to allow the juices to set.

  34. Fan R. says:

    I like the tip to make a list of favourite leftover turkey recipes. Add to that list so when the holiday season comes around we are ready to use the recipes!

  35. Pam says:

    I learned how to flatten a chicken – a useful tip!

  36. Calvin says:

    When roasting a turkey I read that it must have internal temperature of at least 165°F (74°C) when cooked.

  37. Calvin says:

    I like the tip where you freeze them and add them later in chilis, salads, etc.

  38. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    The brining process requires a 6-24 hour soaking period, and ideally should be done the day before roasting.

  39. Angie Andrews says:

    always use a food thermometer to check if meat is fully cooked

  40. Sandra Dufoe says:

    I learned how to carve a turkey properly because before it looked like a hack job. Also learned how to freeze it properly for use in leftovers.

  41. My family would definitely gobble up the Macaroni and Cheese with Mediterranean Turkey Sausage.

  42. krisha4444 says:

    I learned how to flatten a turkey

  43. Carrie says:

    I like #5 – freeze any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays.

  44. Michelle K says:

    I liked the tip to freeze any leftovers.

  45. Shirley O says:

    I learned that when deep frying a turkey it is preferable that the turkey weigh less than 15 lbs.

  46. Erin N says:

    I learned some expert carving techniques!

  47. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    I learnt If basting your turkey, limit opening your oven, once per hour is sufficient.

  48. I learned when buying a whole turkey calculate 1lb. per person or 1.5 lbs. if you want leftovers

  49. Shirley says:

    Let the Bird rest for 20 minutes before carving

  50. hsibley says:

    My favorite tip is to divide the meat into light and dark before freezing.

  51. Dianne G. says:

    I learned that bacteria multiply fastest at temperatures between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F). Chilling food properly is one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of food borne illness.

  52. Calvin says:

    Learned about thawing turkey, and benefits of flash frozen turkey..
    Takes approx 5 hours of thawing time per pound to defrost.

  53. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    You will need a brining bag, available in many kitchen supply stores, which is designed especially to brine poultry

  54. Angie Andrews says:

    I had never thought of barbecuing a whole turkey before, but I might do now the tip section had a handy cooktime guideline based on weight which is really helpful

  55. Kev Danaher says:

    The idea of making Turkey Noodle soup is very appealing.

  56. Marsha Arditti says:

    I have learned that after cooking do not cut for at least 20 minutes to let the juices set in.

  57. Suzanne Souad says:

    Freezing left over turkey and gravy

  58. Tabby72 says:

    I love to save the bones for stock!

  59. Lorna Webster says:

    How to thaw a whole turkey!

  60. kim says:

    I like to save the bones and carcass for soup stock.

  61. Samm says:

    I liked the tip about freezing leftover gravy

  62. Suzie B says:

    I like the tip #9. to Make a list of your favourite leftover turkey recipes – it would be perfect to have that go-to list of recipes on hand

  63. Diane T says:

    BARBEQUE A WHOLE TURKEY

  64. Lester C says:

    Brining a whole turkey prior to roasting

  65. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    I learnt that washing/rinsing meat and poultry prior to cooking is not necessary and may promote cross-contamination to other foods

  66. Shirley O says:

    I learned that it is best to spoon stuffing lightly into turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking.

  67. Travelbuds says:

    I love the idea of freezing any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays. What a great tip.

  68. l p says:

    the addition of the salt in the brining procedure will yield a salty flavour to the turkey so it is wise to omit salt as an ingredient in the turkey stock. thanks

  69. BBQing a whole turkey is easy, just put it breast side up and pour stock in the pan. Baste as you would if done in the oven.

  70. Tainan Lu says:

    I like the tip to freeze any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays.

  71. T Schmidt says:

    freeze any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays

  72. Mike Gismondi says:

    This is my favourite tip … freeze any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays.How brilliant is THAT?

  73. Shirley says:

    Whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year.

  74. Clifford Perkins says:

    I learned how to Carve the Drumsticks on a turkey. I never carve them I just leave them whole and whoever wants them eats them that way..

  75. DonTymchuk says:

    Wrap your turkey leftovers in plastic to avoid freezer burn and you’ll have ready portions on hand.

  76. Julie Bolduc says:

    I learned the proper way to defrost a Turkey

  77. Aarone M says:

    thaw the whole turkey before eating! lol!

  78. Sarah Ferguson says:

    You can make great soup stock by saving the bones.

  79. Marlene V says:

    I learned that you should store your leftovers properly for best results. Shred your turkey or cut it up into slices or cubes and freeze in convenient 1lb meal base portions that are ready to use right from the freezer. Store in an airtight container in the freezer for a quick start to weekday meals.

  80. Sandra says:

    Save the carcass for soup.

  81. Calvin says:

    I learned that when bbqing a turkey, stock or water is required to place in the bottom of pan.

  82. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    CARVING THE DRUMSTICK AND THIGH
    Remove the drumstick and thigh by pressing the leg away from the body of the bird. The joint connecting the leg to the backbone will often snap free, or may be severed easily with a knife point. Cut the dark meat completely from the body by following the body contour carefully with the knife.

  83. Angie Andrews says:

    I learned to keep the turkey hot or put in the fridge and never to leave turkey at room temp for more the 2 hrs

  84. Shirley says:

    Always wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food.

  85. Kimberley says:

    I like the tip about packing up your leftovers within 2 hours of cooking.

  86. Ming says:

    I like the tip about suing leftovers for soup stock

  87. Tina L. says:

    Save the carcass and bones for soup stock.

  88. Jenness M says:

    I like the tip of buying a turkey that is several pounds bigger than what you need so you can have lots for leftover meals.

  89. Diane To says:

    SAFE FOOD HANDLING

  90. wobbles13 says:

    Save the bones for soup stock.

  91. Leah says:

    Love the tips about freezing. Always handy to have stuff in there for future meals!

  92. Clifford Perkins says:

    I learned that cooked turkey can be kept for up to 3 months in your freezer.

  93. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  94. Erin N says:

    I learned about safe food handling with turkey

  95. Rosa Cross says:

    To save the carcass and leftovers for soup.

  96. Anne Derkat says:

    I liked the tip about freezing gravy in muffin tins. This will be so useful.

  97. LILLIAN BROWN says:

    my fave is to save the carcass and bones for soup stock

  98. I have learned that you should only open the oven door once per hour to baste the turkey.

  99. Paresh Pandya says:

    I like Plan for leftovers by allocating 1½ – 2 pounds of turkey per person.

  100. Paresh Pandya says:

    Always wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food.

  101. Shirley O says:

    That a Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F

  102. Patsy says:

    Freeze any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays. Once frozen, store in a zip top bag or air tight container and use as needed. Great idea!

  103. Mary Gaudet says:

    I learned that you never thaw your turkey at room temperature.

  104. Robyn Bellefleur says:

    I like the tip about freezing leftover gravy, never even thought of that.

  105. Calvin says:

    Learned about the cold water method of thawing- It’s fast but you have to hange the water at least every hour.
    Also allow 1 hour of thawing time per pound (2 hours/kg).

  106. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    SLICING DARK MEAT
    Place the drumstick and thigh on a separate plate and cut through the connecting joint. Both pieces may be individually sliced. Tilt the drumstick to a convenient angle, slicing towards the plate.

  107. Angie Andrews says:

    If you brine the turkey you may want to omit the salt in the turkey stock

  108. Chris MacDonald says:

    I would love to make soup so I will save the carcass and bones with some meat still attached.

  109. mermitch says:

    Freezing gravy in ice cube trays is clever!

  110. Shirley says:

    There is no quality or taste difference between a Canada Grade A turkey or Utility grade turkey”

  111. Florence Cochrane says:

    I like the tip for freezing the gravy in ice cube tray first and putting them in an air tight container.

  112. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    When using a meat thermometer, insert it into a thigh being careful not to touch the bone.

  113. My favourite tip is: 4. Save and freeze the turkey carcass and bones, too. Use these to make a delicious turkey stock that can easily be frozen for use in soups, sauces, gravies and mashed potatoes.

    I actually use the turkey carcass the next day to make broth for homemade turkey soup! So good!

  114. Barbara Hall says:

    My fave tip is to freeze leftover gravy in ice cube trays. What a great idea!

  115. Dianne G. says:

    A good tip to remember is to keep your turkey and it’s juices away from foods that won’t be cooked to prevent cross contamination.

  116. Krista M says:

    Freezing those leftovers & sorting the dark and light meat is my favorite tip! How handy to have portions ready to go for your recipes in the week. And those turkey nachos would be one of my main go-to’s!

  117. Monica S says:

    Saving and freezing the carcass to make soup stock . I never thought of freezing it, that is a great tip!

  118. micheline says:

    Never thaw your turkey at room temperature!

  119. Brad says:

    Freezing leftover gravy in ice cube trays is brilliant.

  120. Shirley O says:

    I learned the cooking times, based on weight, for barbecuing a whole turkey

  121. Paresh Pandya says:

    I learned that “There is no quality or taste difference between a Canada Grade A turkey or Utility grade turkey”.

  122. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    SLICING THE THIGH
    Hold firmly onto the plate with a fork. Cut even slices parallel to the bone.

  123. Calvin says:

    When brining add salt and sugar in a small quantity of hot water, also have a brining bag.. some herbs.

  124. Angie Andrews says:

    safest way to thaw a turkey is in the fridge

  125. Shirley says:

    Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  126. ivy pluchinsky says:

    I like the tip about Saving the carcass and bones for soup stock.

  127. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    I learnt that The safest way to thaw a whole frozen turkey is either in the refrigerator or in cold water

  128. Dianne G. says:

    I learned that if you are deep frying you need to choose a turkey weighing less than 15 pounds

  129. I learned about the four basic lessons on Safe Food Handling which are Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill.

  130. Janet P. says:

    I like the one to freeze turkey slices in 1 lb. portions so you have a meal base ready.

  131. Shirley O says:

    I learned that when buying a whole turkey it is best to Calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person in order to determine the size you will need based on the number of guests.

  132. Paresh Pandya says:

    Washing/rinsing meat and poultry prior to cooking is not necessary

  133. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    PREPARING THE BREAST
    Place the knife parallel and as close to the wing as possible. Make a deep cut into the breast, cutting right to the bone. This is your base cut. All breast slices stop at this horizontal cut.

  134. Diane T says:

    “SPATCHCOCKING” OR FLATTENING A WHOLE TURKEY

  135. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill can help prevent harmful bacteria from making your family sick.

  136. LILLIAN BROWN says:

    Thanks . I like the tip about Freezing any leftover gravy in muffin tins

  137. When deep frying choose a turkey weighing less than 15 pounds

  138. Shirley says:

    This method of thawing a turkey is the safest, as it keeps the meat cold until it is completely defrosted.

    Place turkey on a tray on a bottom shelf in refrigerator.
    Allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).
    Health Canada recommends that your refrigerator is set at 4 °C (40 °F)

  139. Shirley O says:

    I liked the tip to freeze any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays.

  140. Erin N says:

    I learned how to make a turkey soup stock by saving the bones!

  141. Dianne G. says:

    If you are deep frying a turkey make sure that the turkey is totally thawed before immersing it in the oil. If you don’t it could overflow the oil in the fryer and it would be dangerous.

  142. Clifford Perkins says:

    I learned that whole turkeys can be frozen up to a year. That’s good because when turkeys are on sale we like to buy one or two.

  143. Paresh Pandya says:

    DO NOT STUFF YOUR TURKEY if frying

  144. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    CARVING THE BREAST
    Carve downward, ending at the base cut. Start each new slice slightly higher up on the breast. Keep slices thin and even.

  145. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    I learnt that you should spoon stuffing lightly into the turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking.

  146. Janine a says:

    i loved the tip of saving left over gravy in ice cube trays! great idea!

  147. Shirley says:

    For roasting a turkey place the turkey breast-up on a rack in a shallow roasting pan.

  148. Erin N says:

    I love the freezing gravy in ice cubes tip! I will definitely use that one 🙂

  149. Paresh Pandya says:

    i learned brining adds flavour and moisture to your turkey meat.

  150. Dianne G. says:

    I learned that there are absolutely no quality differences between fresh and frozen turkeys. So choose the product that works best for you.

  151. Calvin says:

    I learned what spatchcocking means — refers to the removal of the backbone of a bird so that it can be flattened prior to grilling or roasting

  152. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    Never thaw your turkey at room temperature!

  153. Angie Andrews says:

    Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear

  154. Leslie W-H says:

    Save and freeze the turkey carcass and bones, too. Turkey soup is the best on a cold, fall day!

  155. I like the tip that you can change up leftovers by replacing the polenta with rice or pasta.

  156. MrDisco says:

    i learned Whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year.

  157. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    I learnt that cooking a turkey using the rotisserie in your BBQ is easy and results in a delicious meal.

  158. l p says:

    DEEP FRYING SHOULD ONLY BE DONE OUTDOORS AND NEVER ON WOODEN DECKS OR INSIDE A GARAGE. thanks

  159. Shirley says:

    Washing/rinsing meat and poultry prior to cooking is not necessary and may promote cross-contamination to other foods. If you choose to rinse raw poultry, be sure to wash sink and tap areas well with hot soapy water and disinfect with a bleach solution

  160. Shirley O says:

    I learned how to Brine a whole turkey prior to roasting.

  161. Dianne G. says:

    I learned whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year.

  162. Carole D says:

    My favourite tip is to freeze any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays.

  163. Calvin says:

    Was made aware of the 4 key procedures: Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill can help prevent harmful bacteria from making your family sick.

  164. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    REFRIGERATOR METHOD:
    This method of thawing a turkey is the safest, as it keeps the meat cold until it is completely defrosted.

    Place turkey on a tray on a bottom shelf in refrigerator.
    Allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).
    Health Canada recommends that your refrigerator is set at 4 °C (40 °F).

  165. Wendy Jensen says:

    My favourite tip Canadian Turkey shared to make tasty turkey leftover meals my family would love to gobble up is having leftovers on hand to be used in soups, salads, pastas, wraps, casseroles, sandwiches, and more!

  166. Angie Andrews says:

    when looking to buy a turkey, buy one that is big enough for what you need, Calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person. Or if you want leftovers, count on 1.5 lbs (700 g) per person

  167. Janine A says:

    i love the gravy in the ice cube tray trick, great idea, will definitely use!

  168. Shirley says:

    If stuffing the turkey, do so while the oven is preheating. Spoon stuffing lightly into turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking. (Allow ½ cup (125 ml) of stuffing per pound (500 g) of turkey.

  169. Diane T says:

    STORING A FRESH TURKEY

  170. Lester C says:

    Carving the Drumstick and Thigh

  171. LILLIAN BROWN says:

    My favourite tip is to freeze left over gravy and turkey

  172. Nicole Jubleew says:

    My favourite tip is to freeze the turkey bones and some extra meat to use to make soup in the future.

  173. tracy k says:

    spatchcocking sounds great

  174. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    I learnt the recipe for brining a turkey: one 15 to 18 pound (6.8 – 8.2 kg) whole turkey, thawed, giblets and neck removed; (Do not use a pre-stuffed or ready-to-roast turkey)
    • 2 cups (500 mL) Kosher or sea salt (1 cup (250 mL) per 1 gallon (3.785 L) of water)
    • 2 cups (500 mL) brown sugar
    • Spices and herbs as desired – perhaps experiment with a variety of items such as cinnamon sticks, lemon zest, ginger, garlic, shallots, rosemary, thyme, sage
    • 2 gallons (7.8 L) water
    My son always brines our turkeys, not too sure if the recipe’s the same though.

  175. Dianne G. says:

    Bacteria multiply fastest at temperatures between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F) so you need to be very diligent about handling your turkey.

  176. Shirley O says:

    I learned how to deep fry a whole turkey.

  177. MrDisco says:

    do not refreeze thawed Turkey until cooked.

  178. Calvin says:

    When frying a turkey.. be sure that the turkey is totally thawed before immersing it in the oi

  179. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    DEEP FRYING A WHOLE TURKEY
    For best results, choose a turkey weighing less than 15 pounds (less than 6.8 kg).

  180. Angie Andrews says:

    freeze leftover gravy in muffin tins, great idea

  181. Joyce S says:

    I love having leftover cooked turkey in the freezer for quick meals

  182. Diane T says:

    Never thaw your turkey at room temperature!

  183. Lester C says:

    Brining a whole turkey prior to roasting is interesting

  184. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    Today I learnt how to spatchcock a turkey, also known as flattening or butterflying.

  185. Shirley says:

    Roast uncovered, or loosely covered with foil. If you choose to baste your turkey, limit the number of times you open and close your oven (once per hour is sufficient).

  186. Dianne G. says:

    Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey.

  187. piroska says:

    I love the tips about freezing turkey, and especially the one about freezing gravy in an ice cube tray.

  188. mrdisco says:

    i learned Canada Utility turkeys are birds with minor skin tears

  189. Calvin says:

    I learned that you must thoroughly rinse after brining the turkey.

  190. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    COLD WATER METHOD:
    Keep the turkey in its original wrapping.
    In a large container, cover the turkey completely with cold water.
    Change the water at least every hour.
    Allow 1 hour of thawing time per pound (2 hours/kg).

  191. Angie Andrews says:

    save the bones to make stock

  192. Diane To says:

    Washing/rinsing meat and poultry prior to cooking is not necessary and may promote cross-contamination to other foods. If you choose to rinse raw poultry, be sure to wash sink and tap areas well with hot soapy water and disinfect with a bleach solution.

  193. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    Today I learnt that whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year.

  194. Lester C says:

    The brining process requires a 6-24 hour soaking period, and ideally should be done the day before roasting.

  195. Dianne G. says:

    I learned that if you want to brine a turkey it requires a 6-24 hour soaking period and it should be done the day before roasting.

  196. sarah alexis says:

    I like the “Make a list of favourite leftover recipes” tip – i find often I don’t know what to do with leftovers and this would definitely help out!

  197. Shirley says:

    Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone

  198. LILLIAN BROWN says:

    Save the carcass and bones for soup stock

  199. l p says:

    Whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year. thanks

  200. Shirley O says:

    I learned that it takes about 7-8 hours to roast a 24 lb turkey.

  201. mrdisco says:

    Always wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food.

  202. Calvin says:

    I learned that it’s best to avoid bone, and insert the meat thermoter in the thigh to see if it’s cooked thoroughly.

  203. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    DEEP FRYING A WHOLE TURKEY

    If you are using a frozen turkey, be sure that the turkey is totally thawed before immersing it in the oil. If the turkey is still frozen, the oil can spill over the top and be dangerous.

  204. Shirley P says:

    Once thawed, treat a previously frozen turkey as you would a fresh turkey and do not refreeze until cooked

  205. Huguette E. says:

    I’m going to try the turkey lasagna.

  206. Diane To says:

    170°F (77°C) in the thigh for an unstuffed turkey and 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey.

  207. Lester C says:

    urkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  208. hmrcarlson says:

    I learned that you should divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  209. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    Cooked turkey can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.

  210. I learned that when deep frying a whole turkey the oil must be at a minimum of 375 degrees F and it would take approx. 35 minutes to cook

  211. Shirley O says:

    I learned how to flatten a whole turkey.

  212. Dianne G. says:

    I learned if you are deep frying a turkey you should never do it in your garage or on your wooden deck.

  213. mrdisco says:

    when thawing Change the water at least every hour.

  214. l p says:

    allow for leftovers you should allow 1½ – 2 pounds of turkey per person should do it
    thanks

  215. Calvin says:

    Do not use a pre-stuffed or ready-to-roast turkey to brine .. also it’s ideal to use kosher salt, and brown sugar.

  216. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    DEEP FRYING A WHOLE TURKEY – DO NOT STUFF YOUR TURKEY.

  217. Shirley P says:

    Calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person. Or if you want leftovers, count on 1.5 lbs (700 g) per person.

  218. Diane To says:

    Food handling safety risks at home are more common than most people think. The four easy lessons of Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill can help prevent harmful bacteria from making your family sick.

  219. LILLIAN BROWN says:

    favourite tip is if you are thawing the turkey in the refrigerator allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).

  220. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    I learnt how to remove the drumstick and thigh, by pressing the leg away from the body of the bird. The joint connecting the leg to the backbone will often snap free, or may be severed easily with a knife point. Cut the dark meat completely from the body by following the body contour carefully with the knife.

  221. Joyce S says:

    I learned how to carve a turkey!

  222. mrdisco says:

    i learned All turkeys processed in a federally inspected plant bear a “Canada Approved” or “Canada” health inspection stamp.

  223. Tara Kerr says:

    I learned that you can save and cook the carcass to make broth for a turkey soup- honestly, such a great idea and you truly use all of the turkey then, with nothing wasted!

  224. calvin says:

    Some turkey products are meant to be cooked from frozen.

  225. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    BARBEQUE A WHOLE TURKEY
    You can easily use your barbeque to prepare a grilled turkey that’s moist, tender, delicious and nutritious. Prepare turkey as you would if you were roasting it in your oven:

  226. Shirley P says:

    Roast uncovered, or loosely covered with foil. If you choose to baste your turkey, limit the number of times you open and close your oven (once per hour is sufficient)

  227. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    I discovered that Canada Grade A turkeys are well shaped and meaty with even fat covering.
    Canada Utility turkeys are birds with minor skin tears or one or more parts missing which in no way affects the quality.

  228. Dianne G. says:

    A great tip for turkey is bacteria multiply fastest at temperatures between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F), so chilling food properly is one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of food borne illness.

  229. mrdisco says:

    I learned cooking the turkey to an internal temperature of 170°F (77°C) in the thigh for an unstuffed turkey and 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey

  230. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    BARBEQUE A WHOLE TURKEY – Place pan on barbeque grill preheated to medium and close lid. After 20 – 30 minutes, lower heat to medium-low and tent turkey with foil to prevent over-browning.

  231. Angie Andrews says:

    Freeze leftover gravy for later use

  232. Calvin says:

    Learned about carving a turkey, Cut parallelt to the bone.

  233. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    Carving the breast: Place the knife parallel and as close to the wing as possible. Make a deep cut into the breast, cutting right to the bone. This is your base cut. All breast slices stop at this horizontal cut.

  234. mrdisco says:

    Never thaw your turkey at room temperature!

  235. LILLIAN BROWN says:

    I like the tip about Freezing any leftover gravy in muffin tins

  236. Wanda B says:

    My favourite tip is to plan for leftovers. We LOVE leftover turkey. Planning in advance is the best.

  237. Wanda B says:

    I learned how to clean, separate, cook and chill to help prevent harmful bacteria.

  238. joanne darrell says:

    Thaw your turkey in the fridge.

  239. Dianne G. says:

    When thawing your turkey in cold water allow 1 hour of thawing time per pound (2 hours/kg).

  240. Shirley O says:

    I learned that it is best to defrost a turkey in the refrigerator.

  241. l p says:

    Whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year. thanks

  242. Calvin says:

    Learned about thawing a turkey. There are 2 main methods.

  243. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    BARBEQUE A WHOLE TURKEY – Baste every 15 – 20 minutes. For barbeques with temperature settings, keep barbeque adjusted to 350°F – 375°F (177° C – 190°C). Add more water/stock to pan if it dries out during cooking.

  244. Donna L. says:

    I learned to keep raw meat, poultry, and seafood and their juices away from foods that won’t be cooked.

  245. Linda says:

    I like the tip to freeze meal starter packets with leftover turkey.

  246. Diane To says:

    “SPATCHCOCKING” OR FLATTENING A WHOLE TURKEY was interesting to learn about

  247. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    I learnt about CARVING THE DRUMSTICK AND THIGH
    Remove the drumstick and thigh by pressing the leg away from the body of the bird. The joint connecting the leg to the backbone will often snap free, or may be severed easily with a knife point. Cut the dark meat completely from the body by following the body contour carefully with the knife.

  248. Lester C says:

    Deep Frying a Whole Turkey – do not stuff turkey

  249. Shirley P says:

    Once thawed, treat a previously frozen turkey as you would a fresh turkey and do not refreeze until cooked.

  250. LILLIAN BROWN says:

    Save the carcass and bones for soup stock.

  251. Dianne G. says:

    Cooked turkey can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator. This takes the guesswork out of that age old question of – Is this still good?

  252. mrdisco says:

    i learned You will need a brining bag, available in many kitchen supply stores, which is designed especially to brine poultry

  253. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    ROASTING A WHOLE TURKEY – Preheat oven to 350°F (177°C).

  254. Calvin says:

    When bbqing- tent turkey with foil to prevent over-browning.

  255. Shirley P says:

    This method of thawing a turkey is the safest, as it keeps the meat cold until it is completely defrosted
    Place turkey on a tray on a bottom shelf in refrigerator.
    Allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).
    Health Canada recommends that your refrigerator is set at 4 °C (40 °F).

  256. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    All turkeys processed in a federally inspected plant bear a “Canada Approved” or “Canada” health inspection stamp. This stamp tells you that the product is safe to eat.

  257. Diane To says:

    CARVING THE DRUMSTICK AND THIGH
    Remove the drumstick and thigh by pressing the leg away from the body of the bird. The joint connecting the leg to the backbone will often snap free, or may be severed easily with a knife point. Cut the dark meat completely from the body by following the body contour carefully with the knife.

  258. Lester C says:

    Storing Frozen Turkeys

    Whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year.

  259. Devon Pickford says:

    I like the tip of freezing gravy but we never have leftover LOL! Lasagna made with turkey sounds yummy.

  260. Devon Pickford says:

    I also love the tips for bbqing a whole turkey! Hope it’s nice enough out to try this year

  261. Wanda B says:

    Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  262. Valerie Gibson says:

    My favourite tip is #4. Save and freeze the turkey carcass and bones, too. Use these to make a delicious turkey stock that can easily be frozen for use in soups, sauces, gravies and mashed potatoes. I always do this. It makes the BEST soup.

  263. Dianne G. says:

    The best way to make sure your turkey is cooked perfectly is to use a thermometer to get it to the right temperature. You need to insert the meat thermometer in the deepest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  264. mrdisco says:

    Washing/rinsing meat and poultry prior to cooking is not necessary

  265. Shirley O says:

    Defrosting a turkey in the fridge is the safest method.

  266. l p says:

    Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  267. Calvin says:

    Learned that Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey.

  268. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    ROASTING A WHOLE TURKEY – Preheat oven to 350°F (177°C)

  269. Shirley P says:

    Bacteria can spread throughout the kitchen and get on hands, cutting boards, knives and counter tops. Frequent cleaning can keep that from happening. Always wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food

  270. Diane To says:

    OLD WATER METHOD:
    Keep the turkey in its original wrapping.
    In a large container, cover the turkey completely with cold water.
    Change the water at least every hour.
    Allow 1 hour of thawing time per pound (2 hours/kg).

  271. Wanda B says:

    Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  272. LILLIAN BROWN says:

    Spatchcocking” or Flattening a Whole Turkey is something I want to try!

  273. Lester C says:

    Grade A vs. Utility?

    Turkeys are graded according to quality of appearance. Canada Grade A turkeys are well shaped and meaty with even fat covering.

  274. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    Even for experienced cooks, the improper heating and preparation of food means bacteria can survive. Use a food thermometer – you can’t tell if food is cooked safely by how it looks.

  275. l p says:

    save the carcass and bones for soup stock. thanks

  276. Dianne G. says:

    I learned that brining adds flavour and moisture to your turkey meat.

  277. mrdisco says:

    Whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year.

  278. Shirley O says:

    I learned that the optimal temperature for deep-frying a whole turkey is 375°F.

  279. Calvin says:

    Allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound when thawing in fridge.

  280. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    BARBEQUE A WHOLE TURKEY – Lightly brush with oil or melted margarine and sprinkle outside and cavity with seasonings.

  281. Diane To says:

    learned how to carve a turkey

  282. Lester C says:

    there is no quality or taste difference between a Canada Grade A turkey or Utility grade turkey

  283. Shirley O says:

    I learned tips on how to carve a turkey.

  284. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    “There is no quality or taste difference between a Canada Grade A turkey or Utility grade turkey”.

  285. Dianne G. says:

    When stuffing a turkey allow ½ cup (125 ml) of stuffing per pound (500 g) of turkey.

  286. Wanda B says:

    Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  287. mrdisco says:

    If you are using a frozen turkey, be sure that the turkey is totally thawed before immersing it in the oil.

  288. l p says:

    freezing any leftover gravy in muffin tins or ice cube trays is a great idea. thanks

  289. Calvin says:

    To bbq a turkey, best temp is 350°F – 375°F (177° C – 190°C)

  290. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    Roasting a Whole Turkey – If stuffing the turkey, do so while the oven is preheating. Spoon stuffing lightly into turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking. (Allow ½ cup (125 ml) of stuffing per pound (500 g) of turkey.)

  291. Shirley says:

    When roasting, any stuffing placed in the cavity of the bird should read and internal temperature of at least 165°F (74°C).

  292. Wanda B says:

    Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  293. LILLIAN BROWN says:

    I liked the tip to freeze any leftover gravy in muffin tins

  294. Diane To says:

    Insert the meat thermometer in the deepest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey.

  295. Lester C says:

    Deep Frying a Whole Turkey

    For best results, choose a turkey weighing less than 15 pounds (less than 6.8 kg).

  296. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    If stuffing the turkey, do so while the oven is preheating. Spoon stuffing lightly into turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking. (Allow ½ cup (125 ml) of stuffing per pound (500 g) of turkey.)

  297. I learned when slicing the thigh I should cut even slices parallel to the bone.

  298. mrdisco says:

    DO NOT STUFF YOUR TURKEY.

  299. Shirley O says:

    When deep frying a whole turkey it is best that the turkey weigh less than 15 lbs.

  300. Calvin says:

    Deep drying a whole turkey tip– A large canning pot could also be used over a propane burner.

  301. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    ROASTING A WHOLE TURKEY – Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  302. Wanda B says:

    Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  303. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    BARBEQUE A WHOLE TURKEY. Place pan on barbeque grill preheated to medium and close lid. After 20 – 30 minutes, lower heat to medium-low and tent turkey with foil to prevent over-browning. Baste every 15 – 20 minutes.

  304. Florence Cochrane says:

    Allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound when thawing turkey in the fridge.

  305. Shirley P says:

    Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

  306. Dianne G. says:

    Cooked turkey can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 3 months in the freezer.

  307. Shirley O says:

    I learned how to deep fry a turkey.

  308. mrdisco says:

    If the turkey is not fully submerged, mix additional brining solution in the ratios indicated above until there’s enough liquid to cover the entire turkey

  309. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    ROASTING A WHOLE TURKEY – When roasting, any stuffing placed in the cavity of the bird should read and internal temperature of at least 165°F (74°C).
    Remove the turkey from the oven when cooking is completed and let stand 20 minutes to allow the juices to set.

  310. Calvin says:

    Frozen turkeys can be purchased in advance, allowing consumers to take advantage of special sales and coupons. Main point of fresh turkeys are you don’t have to take the time to thaw.

  311. Florence Cochrane says:

    I like the tip on storing cooked turkey. I can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.

  312. Wanda B says:

    Divide your leftovers into dark and white turkey portions before freezing so it will be easy to choose what works best in your recipes.

  313. Daniella Greco says:

    I like to freeze the gravy and reuse it whenever possible!

  314. Erin N says:

    I learned what temperature is best to cook and defrost a turkey at. Happy Thanksgiving!

  315. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    Bacteria multiply fastest at temperatures between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F), so chilling food properly is one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of foodborne illness.

  316. Dianne G. says:

    Once thawed, keep your turkey refrigerated and cook within 48 hours.

  317. When you BBQ a whole turkey place it breast side up in the roasting pan.

  318. mrdisco says:

    An old British term, spatchcocked, refers to the removal of the backbone of a bird so that it can be flattened prior to grilling or roasting

  319. Calvin says:

    Remove the turkey and let stand for 20 minutes before carving. This is after the brining, and roasting process.

    Happy thanksgiving

  320. Debbie White-Beattie says:

    SAFE FOOD HANDLING – CLEAN
    Bacteria can spread throughout the kitchen and get on hands, cutting boards, knives and counter tops. Frequent cleaning can keep that from happening. Always wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food.

  321. Shirley says:

    Cooked turkey can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.

  322. Aarone M says:

    to make the turkey soup stock looks like a fantabulous idea

  323. mrdisco says:

    Canada Utility turkeys are birds with minor skin tears or one or more parts missing which in no way affects the quality.

Thank you for commenting! Your comment is moderated before being published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.