The Important Role of Decor in Nurseries & Kids Rooms – Tips

| June 25, 2013 | 4 Comments

 

Childrens Decor

I have many times walked into a child’s room and wanted to just sit there and soak up the wonderful energy.  The feeling of happiness, of imagination, of being carefree.  The amount of personality in kids rooms is beyond anything I have ever experienced in any other space.

Kids rooms of all ages, from infants to teenagers, are my most favorite spaces to decorate.  A big reason for this is because they aren’t afraid.  They aren’t afraid of color, they aren’t afraid of what people might think, they aren’t afraid to let their own individual quirks and imagination be translated into their personal space, and they definitely aren’t afraid to tell it like it is! I feel we have a lot to learn from kids of all ages and it doesn’t end when it comes to decor and design.

When I am decorating nurseries there are a lot of important developmental psychological elements that I use in the decor.  For example- did you know that an infants sense of sight develops gradually over 6 months?  They cannot see as we do and it is crucial to stimulate this sense in the first months of life.  For this reason I like to use visually stimulating concepts when decorating a nursery.  Using certain colours, sounds, and textures have been proven through psychological studies to aid in the growth and stimulation for infants both mentally and physically.

I remember as a child constantly moving around the furniture in my room, pinning things to ceilings and walls (much to my parents annoyance), and how exciting it was to get new sheets or curtains.  I get much the same feeling decorating children’s rooms.
It’s important that children have a space of their own that will allow them to let their imagination soar, and their minds grow. Children need a spot of their own that speaks to them.  A go-to place that provides security.  Somewhere that fully allows them to imagine, and create – to be a safari hunter on a magnificent adventure, or a princess waiting for a prince. Their room will later grow into the place where they write all their secrets and dreams in, come up with their best ideas, share stories with friends, and retreat to when they feel like no one understands them.

Whether it’s a nursery, a tween room, or a young adult, providing the space that contributes to their function, development and imagination is important.  When I have finished decorating a child’s  room and they say thank you and give me a big hug, I always have to say thank you in return – thank you for inviting me into their world and taking me back to a time of simple innocence and imagination that reaches far beyond the moon!

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Category: Home & Garden, Living

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Comments (4)

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  1. Karen D says:

    As a military family we move A LOT, and have limited how much we let the kids do to decorate since we don’t have much time to prepare the house for sale. I might be more flexible to their choices now. thanks!

  2. Hi Karen,
    Thank you for the comment! I am glad you enjoyed it 🙂

  3. kathy downey says:

    Thanks I enjoyed and learned a few things

  4. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    My kids are now all adults but I’ll pass this on for my grandchildren 🙂

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